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Posts Tagged ‘how-to’

Now that the Inn is quite situated and in a routine of menus & cleanliness, we’re taking tenants for the summer. To be specific, we have one room and can only accommodate one female tenant (she must bear no cats, we have enough strays already). I couldn’t bear to give up my yellow guest room (where to put sisters, dear parents, wonderful in-laws, stray friends and various siblings?), but the little green room (formerly my project nook) was perfect for those seeking summer lodging.

Saturday morning, in the spirit of my dear parents — who every Saturday I can remember would be up early, coffee in hand, at 7A surveying the crazy endeavor of the day, having already been at the mart gathering materials. Complete execution before dinner was essential!

We did likewise and thanks to my sweetheart were able to move the entire contents out of the room before 11. To the unfortunate bed of the yellow room.

Furniture moved out.
Wooden daybed brought from the basement, painted and distressed. I think distressing using a crisp white base is about the classiest thing you can do for an old house.

Lighting fixture repaired.
Quilts, curtains and artwork arranged and hung.



Little chair and small table assigned duties as nightstand and desk.

Jar of pansies perched to add the last touch.

And so, the “Green Room” is ready.

If you would like to distress a little piece — here are some quick steps to transforming it.

Distressing a normal wood/metal furniture:
1. Wipe down with damp rag
2. Lightly sand with grain of wood using small grit sandpaper
3. Paint using shiny white spray paint
4. Let stand 1 hour
5. Lightly sand all over to prepare for 2nd coat
6. Sand ALL edges to remove paint complete to see wood beneath
7. Paint 2nd coat
8. Sand edges to ensure dark wood can be seen through white paint.
9. Optional: Pound a few dents w/ hammer to add the final authentic distressed look

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Have you ever looked in your fridge and wished that there were less packaging bits, and more fresh pure ingredients? Then when at the store the extra 25% $$ of the organic items poke us right back to our happily enriched lives.

I think part of the intense and evil cold I contracted over the weekend impacted my absolutely fiendish desires to grow my own oranges, churn my own butter, and hire pigs to sniff out my mushrooms. AND the overall “pure push” I’m now feeling. But in moderation, I do think a bit of the DIY-@Home is great for the moral if not for the body.

Usually the T’s are content with a lot of produce, meat, some pasta and of course cheese. But recently I have had the keenest desire for homemade diary and breads/starches. So, again I will commence my cooking escapades. Here is the running list. May add more depending on success of #3 & 4
1. Butter
2. Bread
3. Yogurt (again, I think WHOLE milk is the trick)
4. Sour Cream
5. Pasta

So. Yesterday, on a calm sweet Sunday afternoon, while my sweetheart was playing guitar, I took it into my head to make butter. I had purchased the only ingredient necessary: heavy whipping cream.
I had hoped to post pictures of the progress, but I was so eager to be done with it, I didn’t document as I ought to have. So. Here are the ingredients and output of my excellent Sunday afternoon:

I have to say, making butter really is the easiest thing on the planet. These are the steps I took:
1. Shake little container of cream until cream thickens into butter*
2. Separate buttermilk, using a cheesecloth is best, but a firm spoon pat is also fine
3. Eat butter on toast or some other delightful treat

* this time, I shook it in the little carton for about 10 minutes, then transferred it to a clear container, shook for another 5 minutes. At which point I’d made whipped cream, and was slightly fearful I’d committed my cream to whip instead of butter! But, then transferred the whip into mixing bowl. Used electric mixer to mix until it obediently separated into butter & milk. YAY!.

And that my friends is it. When I make it again, I promise to show the unromantic steps.

If you still must have pics of the process, I refer you to Ms. Joy’s “Joy, the Baker.” She did a great job, but I don’t think you need the big mixer — if you have a little hand one, that works great too 🙂

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